Thought for the day, Tuesday 2nd August

From Polishing the Mirror: How to Live from Your Spiritual Heart by Ram Dass,

“If somebody asks me, “Ram Dass, are you happy?” I stop and look inside. “Yes, I’m happy.” “Ram Dass, are you sad?” “Yes, I’m sad.” Answering those questions, I realize that all of those feelings are present. Imagine the richness of a moment in which everything is present: the pain of a broken heart, the joy of a new mother holding her baby, the exquisiteness of a rose in bloom, the grief of losing a loved one. This moment has all of that. It is just living truth.  

The saving grace is being able to witness suffering from the perspective of the soul. Another way to say it is that the saving grace is having faith. Living in the fullness of the moment with joy and suffering, witnessing it in all its perfection, our hearts still go out to those who are suffering.  

If we live in the moment, we are not in time. If you think, “I’m a retired person. I’ve retired from my role,” you are looking back at your life. It’s retrospective; it’s life in the rearview mirror. If you’re young, you might be thinking, “I have my whole life ahead of me. This is what I’ll do later.” That kind of thinking is called time binding. It causes us to focus on the past or the future and to worry about what comes next.  

Getting caught up in memories of the past or worrying about the future is a form of self-imposed suffering. Either retirement or youth can be seen as moving on, a time for something different, something new. Start fresh. It’s a new moment. Aging is not a culmination. Youth isn’t preparation for later. This isn’t the end of the line or the beginning. Now isn’t a time to look back or plan ahead. It’s time to just be present. The present is timeless. Being in the moment, just being here with what is, is ageless, eternal.”

Thought for the day, Monday 1st August

Threshold invocation for the Festival of Lughnasadh by Caitlin Matthews

“Lady of the Land, open the door,
Lord of the Forest, come you in,
Let there be welcome to the bountiful compassion,
Let there be welcome to the Autumn of the Year.
In fruit and grain you are travelling,
In ferment and bread you will arrive.
May the blessed time of Lughnasadh
Nourish the soul of all beings,
Bringing love and healing to all hurts.
From the heights to the depths,
From the depths to the heights,
To the wounds of every soul.”

Thought for the day, Saturday 30th July – International Day of Friendship

“I do not wish to treat friendships daintily, but with roughest courage. When they are real, they are not glass threads or frost-work, but the solidest thing we know.. A friend is a person with whom I may be sincere. Before him, I may think aloud.. The other element of friendship is tenderness.. When a man becomes dear to me, I have touched the goal of fortune.. Friendship is for aid and comfort through all the relations and passages of life and death. It is fit for serene days, and graceful gifts, and country rambles, but also for rough roads and hard fare, shipwreck, poverty, and persecution… We are to dignify to each other the daily needs and offices of man’s life, and embellish it by courage, wisdom and unity.. The essence of friendship is entireness, a total magnanimity and trust.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Thought for the day, Friday 29th July

“I don’t know Who, or what, put the question, I don’t know when it was put. I don’t even remember answering. But at some moment I did answer Yes to Someone, or Something, and from that hour I was certain that existence is meaningful and that, therefore, my life, in self-surrender, had a goal.”

Dag Hammarskjöld, UN Secretary-General and Unitarian, born on this day in 1905

Thought for the day, Wednesday 27th July

Heartwork by Suzy Kassem,

“Each day is born with a sunrise
and ends in a sunset, the same way we
open our eyes to see the light,
and close them to hear the dark.
You have no control over
how your story begins or ends.
But by now, you should know that
all things have an ending.
Every spark returns to darkness.
Every sound returns to silence.
Every flower returns to sleep
with the earth.
The journey of the sun
and moon is predictable. But yours,
is your ultimate
ART.”

Thought for the day, Monday 25th July

In the Meantime by Tom Hirons,

“Meanwhile, flowers still bloom.
The moon rises, and the sun.
Babies smile and somewhere,
Against all the odds,
Two people are falling in love.
Strangers share cigarettes and jokes.
Light plays on the surface of water.
Grace occurs on unlikely streets
And we hold each other fast
Against entropy, the fires and the flood.
Life leans towards living
And, while death claims all things at the end,
There were such precious times between,
In which everything was radiant
And we loved, again, this world.”

Thought for the day, Sunday 24th July

How Webb can light the spark of our souls by Matthew Fox,

“Can the James Webb Telescope contribute to soul work therefore and light the sparks of our souls? Does it light the spark of our inner work?
Inner work is about Gratitude. Can meditating on the original galaxies and stars of the universe awaken gratitude?
Inner work is about Awe. Do Webb’s pictures bespeak Awe?
Inner work is about Reverence. Can reverence and respect for our existence follow from Webb’s revelations?
Inner work is about biophilia (love of life and evolution’s journey into life) and setting necrophilia aside (love of death).
Inner work is about Eros (not Thanatos).
Inner work is about Wisdom (which includes Eros and embraces knowledge but is bigger than knowledge alone).
Inner work marries the divine feminine and sacred masculine and recognizes authentic power as transformation and craft and power-with, not power as control or domination or power-over).
Inner work is about Silence including the silence that Awe brings.
Inner work is about Emptying (including emptying our minds about how we used to think about the age, size and journey of the universe and how we got here).
Inner work is about tasting Nothingness.
Inner work undergoes the Dark Night of the Soul and society and our species.
Inner work is about Black Holes, both physical and psychical.
Outer work born of inner work is about Creativity.
Outer work is about Birthing. Birthing ways of survival, participating in the birthing of the universe otherwise known as ‘evolution’ and contributing to it.
Father Sky is busy birthing and Mother Earth is busy birthing and humanity can be also, even birthing the Webb Telescope and so much more.
Birthing a better version of human where co-operation, not competition is the norm.
Outer work means Birthing Compassion and Justice.
Outer work is about why we are here…
…and where here is
…and that the cosmos birthed us…
and that we can praise.
Outer work includes celebration.
Outer work includes passion for justice—eco, racial, economic, social, gender, gender preference, etc.
Outer work means caring about future generations—of humans surely –but of all children of Mother Earth.
Outer work is passing on the goodness of being.
“The first and primary meaning of salvation is this: To preserve things in the good.” (Thomas Aquinas)”